Impressions

by Cochran

My Best of #SocialFresh East

I attended the #SocialFresh East conference in Tampa earlier this week. The lineup was packed with impressive presenters on a wide variety of up-to-the-minute social marketing topics.

Though many attendees were online for the entire conference, I find that I get more out such sessions if I focus my attention on the presenter rather than on my laptop or iPhone. I did jot down a few key phrases to help me better recall each speaker and his or her topic.

  My Best of #SocialFresh East:

Don’t think social media. Think social marketing in the broadest sense. —  @JHCdigital aka Jesse Caitlin, eMarketer

Ask for the sale on social.@ericboggs aka Eric Boggs, Argyle Social

Gradual scaling always wins.@chuckhemann aka Chuck Hemann, WCG

Without a call to action, there is no marketing.@kippbodnar aka Kipp Bodnar, HubSpot

Use social elements in all that you do.@ScottMonty aka Scott Monty, Ford Motor Company

We need to concentrate on being social rather than doing social.@jaybaer aka Jay Baer, Convince & Convert

Don’t have a Pinterest strategy. As with other platforms, have goals.@ShaunaCausey aka Shauna Causey, Nordstrom

Assess your company’s social media readiness first.@jquig99 aka Jane Quigley, StrategyJQ

Rather than being a community manager, become a social coach. #ElevateSocial — @adriandparker aka Adrian Parker, Intuit

Beware of measurement bias. Look rather than measure.@cspenn aka Christopher Penn, WhatCounts

Ask one question per month to your list.@cnmoody aka Chris Moody, Red Hat

Do a content audit upon choosing platforms.@MatthewKnell aka Matthew Knell, AOL

Thanks to everyone for an incredible learning experience. @cochrancreates aka Rebecca Cochran, Cochran Creative Group

February 9, 2012 Posted by | Marketing, metrics, Online Marketing, return on social investment, social marketing, social media | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Learning to Unmeasure

I hereby proclaim 2012 the year that we learn to unmeasure.

Measurement is really about the past. When we analyze, or measure anything, we’re using the past as the benchmark. How backwards.

Try as we might, we can’t truly measure success. We may think we can. We may attain a certain level of confidence, knowing we’ve reached a prescribed goal. But, truly successful people are smart enough to focus on the future, rather than the past. They use each new success as a launching pad for their next challenge and subsequent success.

Happiness is another unmeasurable. Happiness is intangible and fleeting. It seemingly comes and goes throughout our lives. The wisest among us learn to amortize happiness over the course of life, rather than gauging happiness on a day-to-day basis. Happiness is an art.

Art. Now, there’s an unmeasurable. Art looks, feels and sounds different every time we interact with it. Music and art critics attempt to use words to convey the value of any musical composition, piece of art or literary work, but most of those critics will admit that words are a poor measurement tool. Art is, after all, about feeling, both for the artist and the viewer, listener or consumer of that art. And, how can we measure feelings?

On the business side, is it really possible to measure brand loyalty? Or return on social investment (ROSI)? We can attempt to, but these are almost as elusive to measure as happiness and feelings. And, by the way, brand loyalty and ROSI each include a certain amount of happiness (or unhappiness) and other feelings at their core.

And, what about employee engagement? Do we really need fancy tools to measure that? Engaged employees do positively affect a company’s bottom line (now, that’s a measurement). But, perhaps, employee engagement should be regarded more as a philosophy, rather than something to be measured. When we begin to measure something, we’re then compelled to analyze it to the point that we lose the human element. And, employees want to be treated as humans, not numbers.

That which gets measured matters? Or that which matters is worth measuring?

I say neither. Thankfully, the most important things in life and in business cannot truly be measured. We should all practice the art of unmeasuring once in a while. By doing so, we’ll give ourselves the opportunity to become better listeners, better observers, better friends and better leaders.

What are your thoughts? What are some areas in your personal and/or business life where you can take an unmeasurement approach?

January 8, 2012 Posted by | brand loyalty, design thinking, empathy, employee engagement, happiness, measurement, return on social investment | , | 1 Comment